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Monday, July 21, 2014

Painterly Progression

Raindrops and Twinkle Lights work in progress Katherine Kean
oil 18 x 24 inches
This painting was stalled in the studio for some time. Can you blame me? To me these rainy paintings call for a wet on wet painterly approach - at least in the beginning, and that's something I find that demands a large block of uninterrupted studio time. 

Raindrops and Twinkle Lights work in progress (detail)
Katherine Kean
oil 18 x 24 inches
That means no pending appointments, phone calls, coffee dates, or distracted excursions into the garden. Once into it though, it couldn't be more fun. I love brushstrokes and painterly visual effects and I intend to go to town on this one; varied and broken brushstrokes, sketchiness,  impasto, the works.

Raindrops and Twinkle Lights work in progress Katherine Kean
oil 18 x 24 inches
In the photo above there are about 4 layers of paint, with some areas having more transparency than others. Lately I am working on stormy, rainy, and snowy paintings and enjoying painting 'against' the season. While I'm painting I can almost forget that Los Angeles is in the middle of a strangely humid drought.

"An oil painting is painterly when there are visible brushstrokes, the result of applying paint in a less than completely controlled manner, generally without closely following carefully drawn lines. Works characterized as either painterly or linear can be produced with any painting media, oils, acrylics, watercolors, gouache, etc. Some artists whose work could be characterized as painterly are Pierre Bonnard, Francis Bacon, Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt, Renoir, and John Singer Sargent. In watercolor it might be represented by the early watercolors of Andrew Wyeth." - Wikipedia Painterliness

2 comments:

Allan Roman Reyes said...

Wonderful work, Katherine. Painterliness has always been an object of my own 'responses'. Nothing is quite as exciting, IMHO, as letting the paint go about its business while you suggest pathways and relations to masses as they are formed. I think the key is a sensitivity to the surface and an affinity for the medium and pigment -something wordless yet so tactile that moments of euphoria come with a rush.

Katherine Kean said...

Hi Allan,
Well said. I might add that a willingness to explore how various mediums affect the paint flow is part of the fun.